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FREE CHAPTER: Governance in the Resilient Organization

Get your free chapter on Governance in the Resilient Organization from the book Principles and Practice of Business Continuity Tools and Techniques, by Jim Burtles.

This free chapter will help you go over practicing business continuity tools  Understanding this will help you to:
  • Maintain a permanent response capability.
  • Manage major organizational changes.
  • Understand what it takes to achieve ongoing resilience.
  • Develop resilience as an integral part of your culture.
In the first 15 chapters of Jim Burtles' book, you will learn how and why you might approach the development and delivery of a successful and effective business continuity (BC) program. You will also learn the importance of governance in the resilient organization. In this free chapter, whether an experienced business continuity practitioner or a person entering the profession, you can see where business continuity fits within your organization’s hierarchy.

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principles-practice-business-continuity-textbook-rothstein-publishing

FREE CHAPTER: Governance in the Resilient Organization

Get your free chapter on Governance in the Resilient Organization from the book Principles and Practice of Business Continuity Tools and Techniques, by Jim Burtles.

In the first 15 chapters of Jim Burtles' book, you learn how and why you might approach the development and delivery of a successful and effective business continuity (BC) program. This process has involved exploring the tools, techniques, and products. By now, you should be in a position to practice this discipline in a professional manner, and this book has focused on the detail level at which BC is expected to operate and prove to be beneficial. Now, in this chapter on governance in the resilient organization, it is intended for both the experienced BC practitioner and a person entering the profession, you have a chance to look upwards and outwards to see where BC fits within your organization’s hierarchy and how it might filter upwards and penetrate downwards, as BC is integrated into your corporate culture.

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Business Continuity Awareness Week

BCI Manifesto for Organizational Resilience

The world is an ever-changing landscape in terms of risk, and as these changes happen, the business continuity and resilience industry must evolve. The BCI is proud to be a part of this evolution and we are releasing our Manifesto for Organizational Resilience during Business Continuity Awareness Week (BCAW) 2018. The manifesto positions us within the organizational resilience sphere; not as the ‘know-all’ organization, but as a central point for collaboration across all management disciplines.

Read More

Business Continuity Awareness Week

BCI Manifesto for Organizational Resilience

The world is an ever-changing landscape in terms of risk, and as these changes happen, the business continuity and resilience industry must evolve. The BCI is proud to be a part of this evolution and we are releasing our Manifesto for Organizational Resilience during Business Continuity Awareness Week (BCAW) 2018. The manifesto positions us within the organizational resilience sphere; not as the ‘know-all’ organization, but as a central point for collaboration across all management disciplines.

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On Stones, Clay and Rubber Balls, by Mark Armour

Why we need to agree on our definitions and change our thinking around risk management, business continuity and resilience.

First, this is not about where the responsibility for business continuity should reside within an organization. It is about the responsibilities of the business continuity profession and its practitioners. Lately, I’ve witnessed the practice of risk management begin to take over that of business continuity. Many practitioners promote this alignment and foster the perception that business continuity is simply a part of the practice of risk management. I say this is bad for both disciplines and the organizations they serve.

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