Typhoon Ruined Traditional, High-Tech Livelihoods


The workload of call and data centers that are soaked in water and choked with debris has easily been diverted to other Philippine cities. Less simple is the choice faced by thousands of workers: uproot and separate from family or stay in Leyte province and wait perhaps a year for the jobs to return.

As Typhoon Haiyan tore across the eastern Philippines, coconut plantations older than the fathers of the men who tend them were smashed like matchsticks and call centers that field customer service gripes from around the world fell silent.

In this Tuesday Nov. 19, 2013 photo, workers clear debris at the damaged Expert Global Solutions call center in Palo, Leyte, central Philippines. As Typhoon Haiyan tore across the eastern Philippines, coconut plantations older than the fathers of the men who tend them were smashed like matchsticks and call centers that field customer service gripes from around the world fell silent. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

The storm that killed thousands also wrecked livelihoods in the worst hit region, a blow that will ripple long after the disaster fades from attention.

See Typhoon Ruined Traditional, High-Tech Livelihoods, by Teresa Cerojano, Associated Press.

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